Craig Stuart Wilson

Mystery, Thriller & Suspense

Author Profile

Craig Stuart Wilson

Craig S Wilson is a serial creative who has written 300 songs, three musicals, and three books. He published “Dating for Life” in 2013, a book describing the four keys to maintaining successful relationships. "Gig" is a historical fiction based on his passion for the exploding music scene of the 60’s and the wonderment of teenage romance. He will soon be launching ”RIO”, a novel about the quest for survival of a street kid named Lucas Rocha in the glorious and gritty Rio de Janeiro. Throughout his entire life, he’s been passionate about almost anything that he does, as his mantra is “living life in crescendo.” Through his personal journey in finding the love and partner of his life, Melissa G. Wilson, he continues to pursue his dreams of creating beauty in the world and changing people's lives through his stories. See more at http://craigswilson.com/bio/

Books

RIO Street Kid Stargazer

Mystery, Thriller & Suspense

This action-packed international crime thriller takes readers into the slums of Rio de Janeiro, where thousands of homeless children face horrific choices every day. It’s no exception when sixteen-year-old Rio street kid Lucas Rocha meets Daniel Burke, a Brazilian-American businessman visiting from Boston. Recently orphaned, the idealistic Lucas struggles to put bread on the table for his younger sisters and keep them safe while he earns a living on Rio’s unforgiving streets. Should he beg, steal or sell drugs to survive? When Lucas snatches Daniel’s wallet in an act of desperation, it sets in motion a series of catastrophic events, and the lives of these two strangers become permanently … and dangerously … entangled. Facing down Rio’s powerful drug lords, both Lucas and Daniel are hell-bent to beat the odds and make things right. But what is right in a world filled with wrong?

Book Bubbles from RIO Street Kid Stargazer

Ever meet a sociopath?

Definition: noun, Psychiatry. "a person with a psychopathic personality whose behavior is antisocial, often criminal, and who lacks a sense of moral responsibility or social conscience." There is a notable difference between someone with a wild hare, and a lunatic. That difference is measured in terms of guilt. I met a guy once who was not a murderer as yet, but lived on the border of "scary" all the time. More concerning, he was very successful in the business world. When you compare people like a mobster and Bernie Madoff, the major difference is that one commits murder, and the other commits unspeakable crimes.

RIO Street Kid Stargazer

Mystery, Thriller & Suspense

This action-packed international crime thriller takes readers into the slums of Rio de Janeiro, where thousands of homeless children face horrific choices every day. It’s no exception when sixteen-year-old Rio street kid Lucas Rocha meets Daniel Burke, a Brazilian-American businessman visiting from Boston. Recently orphaned, the idealistic Lucas struggles to put bread on the table for his younger sisters and keep them safe while he earns a living on Rio’s unforgiving streets. Should he beg, steal or sell drugs to survive? When Lucas snatches Daniel’s wallet in an act of desperation, it sets in motion a series of catastrophic events, and the lives of these two strangers become permanently … and dangerously … entangled. Facing down Rio’s powerful drug lords, both Lucas and Daniel are hell-bent to beat the odds and make things right. But what is right in a world filled with wrong?

Book Bubbles from RIO Street Kid Stargazer

Off-the-beaten-path tourism

When a street kid stole my money, I chased him for over a mile up into the favelas. When he threw the money up into the air and I picked it up, what I saw around me was nothing you would ever witness near rows of tourist hotels. This was the real RIO and I never forgot it.

Work is work...

Drug gangs are a tough business. No matter where they are formed in the world, there are rules to follow like in any corporation. You rise up within the organization by succeeding. However, the penalty for failure in a gang is much greater than in any other job imaginable. The average life span of a drug runner is measured in months. Lucas Rocha was desperate to choose this route.

Ever meet someone with emphysema?

Matheus and Isabella are senior residents of the favela, and act as the voices of reason to young Lucas Rocha. Matheus grapples with an advanced case of emphysema. When I was in my twenties, I met a man who reminded me of him. He spoke passionately about life until he would run out of air and have to regroup. As I wrote for the character, Matheus, I can still picture the old man I once knew in this scene. His advice were words of wisdom.

Graveyard tours

Like Huckleberry Finn, Lucas Rocha had a "right-of-passage" to gain the trust of the gang. He was ordered to rendezvous at a very musty cemetery at Midnight. This is a scary-enough thing for any teenager to do, but what followed was certainly infinitely more harrowing.

Not Just in RIO

There's a massive dislocation of people going on in Rio. Imagine if one day you were told that your entire neighborhood was to be cleared out to make room for a parking lot and you had two weeks to move. Call it "squatter's rights" because the land isn't owned by the settlers of the sixties. Nonetheless, think of the impact on your family when it finds itself living in the streets. Thus was the initial struggle for Lucas Rocha and his family.

Parental Insights

Marina Serrano is the mother of Gabriela. She has raised her daughter to honor God, although she hides a secret that could alter their relationship forever. Gabriela is nearing a degree in social work, but is smitten with an American who is visiting Rio to learn about his heritage as well as enjoy the Carnival. As they walk to church, Mama reminds her daughter of what's important in life. Wherever you are in the world, almost always, a good parent will always be watching out for you.

No-Win Situation

Imagine finding yourself confronted with a ruthless gang leader who wants something from you that will clearly jeopardize your friend. What would you do in this no-win situation?

Climbing a tree can be dangerous.

When you were a kid, did you ever climb a tree? Imagine rescuing your little sister from high atop a tree, only witness the brittle branch underneath her snap sending her careening down. You catch her by the ankle? Could you hang on?

The IRONY of RIO

Cristo Redentor is an Art Deco statue of Jesus Christ in Rio de Janeiro, standing 98 feet tall, with forgiving arms stretched out 92 feet wide. Christ the Redeemer is the iconic symbol of RIO, peering out over all the splendor and squalor from the peak of Corcovado Mountain in the Tijuca Forest National Park. It is one of the New Seven Wonders of the World and a global symbol of Christianity. But to those living in the tepid favelas below, like Lucas Rocha, it is a reminder that sometimes good people must do bad things for a greater good, if they are to survive.

Art imitates Real

Rio de Janeiro is a real city and Amigos dos Amigos is a real drug gang. It turns out that there was a real drug lord over Rocinha by the name of Antônio Francisco Bonfim Lopes, known to all as "Nem." I didn't discover this fact until I was well into writing my book. Turns out there is a book just released on the man: Nemesis: One Man and the Battle for Rio, by Misha Glenny. For fifty years, Rio government paid no attention to it's slums until the advent of the World Cup and Olympics forced change. As Nem’s story shows, charm and horror coexist, as drug lords were cast as judge and jury over their favelas, and often became celebrities in the process.

A Chance Encounter

This passage was inspired by a true story. I was sent on a business trip to Latin America. I don’t speak Spanish or Portuguese, so my export agent was to meet me on my first stop, Rio de Janeiro. He never showed up because his visa had expired. I was on my own. The first person I ran into was a scraggly street kid, who tossed dust on my shoes, then asked me in pigeon English if I wanted my shoes shined. I humored him. When he was done, he asked for a tip that was 20 times the going rate. We haggled until I agreed to give him $5. As soon as I pulled out my money clip, he snatched it, and ran like the wind. Luckily, I was a runner too, and I chased him into the favelas until he threw the money clip into the air and pushed over an elderly woman to block me. I helped the woman up, and was surprised when she scolded me. “Never give money to these street rats. You make the problem worse.” I never forgot that moment. It inspired me to write about the 10,000 kids trying to survive on the streets of Rio.

Click Follow to receive emails when this author adds content on Bublish